Monthly Archives: August 2012

MAGIC THAT BELIEVES ITSELF

Art, being bartender, is never drunk;

And magic that believes itself must die.

–Peter Viereck

This passionate drawing by Bob Peak shows how he became swept up by the fury and speed of a horse race…

…except it turns out that Peak made several careful studies to achieve that spontaneous look. He re-copied drafts on tracing paper, preserving the elements he liked.

He even drew faint pencil guidelines so he would know the best way to make his bold, slashing strokes appear free and unconstrained:

Peak employed old conjurer’s tricks to create the magic in art. (Viereck described art as “a hoax redeemed by awe.”) It might have been personally more cathartic for Peak if he reacted to the thrill of the race by making wild, unrehearsed scribbles but it would have made for lousy art.

David Seymour took this photograph of a young Polish girl who, after being freed from a Nazi concentration camp, was asked to draw a picture of her home.

The anguish in her face is unmistakeable. Her picture amounts to nothing more than a frantic jumble.

Long ago, Nietzsche wrote of the “self-conquest” necessary to make “torrential passion…become still in beauty.” Shakespeare, who also knew a thing or two about passion, lauded those with the power to move others while remaining in control of their own faces:

(more…)

Staff security badges from Los Alamos, used during Project Y;…


Robert Oppenheimer


Richard Feynman


Klaus Fuchs


Leslie Groves


Ted Hall

Staff security badges from Los Alamos, used during Project Y; Los Alamos has a large number of these available online.

Oppenheimer and Feynman are shown above, along with Maj. Gen. Leslie Groves, the Army officer who oversaw the project. Also shown are atomic spies Klaus Fuchs and Theodore Hall, both of whom supplied information to the USSR.

(View on Tumblr)

A Cheetah and Tiger Sculpted from Wire Coathangers by David Mach

A Cheetah and Tiger Sculpted from Wire Coathangers by David Mach sculpture mutiples animals

A Cheetah and Tiger Sculpted from Wire Coathangers by David Mach sculpture mutiples animals

A Cheetah and Tiger Sculpted from Wire Coathangers by David Mach sculpture mutiples animals

A Cheetah and Tiger Sculpted from Wire Coathangers by David Mach sculpture mutiples animals

Scottish artist David Mach has been referred to as an “artist of excess” who uses unassuming objects such as magazines, match heads, and even coathangers to construct large-scale icons from pop culture, animals, and even religious figures. His latest works are a particularly vicious pair of cats, a cheetah and tiger constructed using his distinct method of layering hundreds of clipped wire coathangers. The two will soon be on display at Opera Gallery in Geneva.

(Via Colossal)