Monthly Archives: February 2013

Seb Lester Demonstrates Medieval Blackletter Caligraphy

Seb Lester Demonstrates Medieval Blackletter Caligraphy typography caligraphy

In this brief video graphic designer and illustrator Seb Lester demonstrates a form of Medieval blackletter typography that was used commonly in Europe from 1150 to around the 17th century. From a person whose handwriting is almost completely illegible, almost every stroke of his pen looks like a complete miracle. (via vimeo)

(Via Colossal)

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

The Natural and Urban Collide in the Drawings of Pat Perry illustration drawing

A peek inside the sketchbooks of Michigan based artist and illustrator Pat Perry reveals a fascinating world where the natural world seems on a direct collision course with the urban. Silhouettes of people and wildlife are filled with rich, textured stories that seem to be representative of dreamlike memories. The detail in Perry’s work is undeniably amazing, even the images above don’t quite do it justice, spend some time scrolling (horizontally) through his sketchbook blog to see what I’m talking about. I recommend following Perry on Flickr, Facebook or via his blog, and he has numerous reasonably priced prints available in his store including may of the works above. He also did a great interview a while back with Amir from Beautiful Decay which you can read over on the Huffington Post. (via booooooom)

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Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

Out of Disorder: Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and Intricate Thread Sculptures by Takahiro Iwasaki thread textiles sculpture

When first approaching the artwork of Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki it’s entirely possible you might miss it altogether. Not only are his small buildings and electrical towers excruciatingly small and delicate, but they also rest on absurdly mundane objects: rolls of tape, a haphazardly wrinkled towel, or from the bristles of a discarded toothbrush. Only on close inspection do the small details come into focus, faint hints of urbanization sprouting from disorder. My favorite pieces are his topographical maps that have been carefully cut from thick rolls of gray and blue electrical tape. Many of these objects were on view as part of the Constellations show at Cornerhouse in Manchester back in 2011 and at C24 Gallery last year. However Iwasaki currently has a new collection of much larger works at the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art at GOMA in Queensland, much of which you can see over at designboom. (via artscharity.org, cornerhouse, c24 gallery, karl steel)

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William Butler Yeats… notebook page …1920

 photo YVP336_zps4be6dbc8.jpg
sketch from 19 August 1920

One sketch from 19 August 1920 brings together a tower with water,
apple trees and flowering trees as well as birds and a unicorn
(labelled, on the right-hand side), said to be carrying a mask from a tree with its horn and “Rushing”.
The two sets of trees are labelled apple trees and flowering trees, which may represent
the same contrast of flower and fruit that Dulac used in his woodcut of the Great Wheel.
But elsewhere in the Automatic Script, the tree is the symbol of the primary and the mask of the antithetical, so that the unicorn’s carrying away may represent a temporary triumph
of the antithetical or rescue for the antithetical Yeatses, as they build the tower of their
antithetical system…. more