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When Mickey Mouse was sent to a Nazi concentration camp

In 1942, Horst Rosenthal was sent to the Vichy concentration camp Gurs, where he drew a comic-book that survived him: Mickey au Camp de Gurs, it tells the story of Mickey Mouse being snatched from the street and sent to Gurs, and features a tour of Gurs that uses a brave face of humor to cope with enormous suffering.

Two more of Rosenthal’s comics from Gurs survive; Rosenthal did not. He was sent to Auschwitz and killed on arrival.

Alister Wedderburn, a researcher at the Australian National University’s department of International Relations, has documented Rosenthal’s story in a new paper in Millennium: Journal of International Studies entitled (more…)

This “Death Comet” Looks Like a Skull

Actually that’s Asteroid 2015 TB145 as spotted by NASA’s Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, when it zipped past Earth – missing it by just 300,000 miles – on Halloween three years ago.

It’s making the rounds again on the Internet, but its likely won’t come that close to Earth when it comes around again this year.

By: Neatorama
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2y7lMsy

This is the golden age of Chinese science fiction

We’ve been covering the rise and rise of Chinese science fiction here since the early part of the decade, as Chinese authors have been successfully exported to the English-speaking world (a rare feat, as there are enough books written in English to satisfy demand, leading to a real poverty of literature translated into English), which broke through in 2016, when authors like Hao Jingfang took home Hugo awards, along with the incredible Cixin Liu.
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By: Boing Boing
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2Qt3M4z

Commercial Streetscape in Watercolor

What attracts me to this scene in Kingston, New York is the cluster of poles and wires next to the sign, and the delicate details of the far distance.

Transparent watercolor is fast and direct. I also like watercolor because it makes gradations easier, and the accidental variations and textures seem to work in my favor for this scene.

I limit the colors to a blue / brown gamut, disregarding greens and reds. I want to keep the lights light and the darks dark like a high contrast photo.


(Link to video on Facebook) This video takes you through the process. Note that I first wet the surface with clear water before applying the ghost wash. There are a few white gouache touches at the end.

On Facebook, Linda Navroth asks: “It’s cool to watch you use gouache like oils – building up layers. How do you choose your scene? Sometimes at first they look quite unremarkable, but by the time you’re done, it’s always something special. Do you sense that quality when you start or is it imbued with some sort of “Gurney Magic” during the process?”
The first requirement was shade, because it was so hot. Second was the contre-jour angle toward the light. Beyond that I felt the view had minimal prospects. And I had very low expectations about my painting from the beginning to the end of the process. 

There’s no Gurney Magic, but there is a procedure that I trust. To paraphrase photographer “William Eggleston when asked why he photographs mundane things, I would say ‘I paint things to see what they look like painted.’ Route 9W seems to be my Briar Patch, my Kuerner’s Farm. That unloved stretch of highway always attracts me. I know that artistic gems are hidden there that I have a chance of finding if I just set up and start painting, with the meter of my mind tuned midway between doubt and confidence.

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Huge leak shows off the new iPhone XS

Get ready for a leaked look at the new iPhone XS. 9to5Mac has gotten its hands on an image of Apple’s next generation of iPhone hardware, and the future looks pretty swanky.

The leaked image showcases the new sizing of Apple’s soon-to-be-unveiled flagship bezel-less devices, which likely will have 5.8-inch and 6.5-inch screens, respectively. The phones will be called the iPhone XS, according to the report. The pictured devices represent the higher-end OLED screen models, not the cheaper rumored notch LCD iPhone.

The device will feature a new gold color shell. The iPhone X is currently available in space gray and silver.

Image credit: 9to5mac

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Tri-Triplane Monster Plane (1921)

JF Ptak Science Books   Quick Post

A short article (with a smaller photo illustration)  on a very big topic appeared in Illustrated World in June 1921. The photo showed a remarkable plane constructed by aeronautical engineer Giovanni Caproni (1886-1957)–three planes, really. Three triplanes were attached to a floating Pullman-like fuselage, making this the largest/heaviest aircraft ever built at that time. It was 32′ high, 66′ long, and 130′ wide, and was made to seat 100 and make a transatlantic voyage. This was the “Noviplano” (the Caproni Ca. 6c, and translated in the article as “Nine-plannen”), and presented itself in an impressive if not complicated manner–it was a prototype, though, and was crashed and finished on its second flight.  

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Books in Denmark library found to be poisonous

Researchers at the University of Southern Denmark have discovered that three of the volumes in the university’s library rare books collection are poisonous. All three of them are history books. (Is it weird that that makes me inordinately proud?)

The books were not suspected of having killed a number of monks in a forbidding monastery in the Italian Alps. In fact, the study had nothing to do with identifying lethal literature. These three books were selected because they were known from previous investigation to have medieval manuscript fragments in their covers. Recycling old parchment was a common practice for bookbinders in the 16th and 17th centuries. Researchers aimed to use imaging technology to identify which Latin texts had been used to make the covers, or at least to recover legible passages.

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A Kinetic Sculpture Twists and Morphs Based on the Fibonacci Sequence

London-based sculptor Ivan Black creates large-scale kinetic sculptures that are inspired by mathematical formulae and minimal design. One of his latest pieces, Square Wave, is smaller than his typical works and was designed in response to the Fibonacci sequence of numbers. The mobile-like object is made up of several metal bands which curve and flatten as the work twists, creating a mesmerizing movement that is at once fluid and strictly geometric.

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