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Illustrator Spotlight: Jenna Kass

A selection of drawings by Jenna Kass, who considers herself a fantasy illustrator but one who is uninterested in the male-dominated nature of the genre and instead focuses on quiet moments. She’s an SVA grad, based in New York City. More images below.

By: BOOOOOOOM!
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2tpE2KI

This isn’t Happiness: The heartbreak, depression and empty sex of Modern Love

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Peter Nidzgorski is the artist provocateur behind the site This isn’t Happiness™. Under the name Peteski, he blogs about art, photographs, design, and disappointment. All of which has made This isn’t Happiness™ “One of the �…

By: Dangerous Minds
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2rEdinK

Things to Come

In 1899, preparing for festivities in Lyon marking the new century, French toy manufacturer Armand Gervais commissioned a set of 50 color engravings from freelance artist Jean-Marc Côté depicting the world as it might exist in the year 2000.

The set itself has a precarious history. Gervais died suddenly in 1899, when only a few sets had been run off the press in his basement. “The factory was shuttered, and the contents of that basement remained hidden for the next twenty-five years,” writes James Gleick in Time Travel. “A Parisian antiques dealer stumbled upon the Gervais inventory in the twenties and bought the lot, including a single proof set of Côté’s cards in pristine condition. He had them for fifty years, finally selling them in 1978 to Christopher Hyde, a Canadian writer who came across his shop on rue de l’Ancienne-Comédie.”

Hyde showed them to Isaac Asimov, who published them in 1986 as Futuredays, with a gentle commentary on what Côté had got right (widespread automation) and wrong (clothing styles). But maybe some of these visions are still ahead of us:

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Wikimedia Commons has the full set.

By: Futility Closet
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2sHHQ9Z

Segmented and Compartmentalized Graphite Portraits by Miles Johnston

The female characters inhabiting the world of London-based illustrator Miles Johnston appear to be undergoing near perpetual transformation, their faces or bodies split in half, or their entire form morphing into globby organic forms. Over the past few years he’s examined four specific transformations organized into series titled Deform, Divide, Attract, and Recur. Johnston will have work on view at the upcoming Small Works exhibition at beinArt Gallery and you can also follow him on Instagram. (via Booooooom, Artnau)

By: Colossal
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2raHPsS

Mysterious “Wow!” Signal Gets Solid Explanation

Bob Yirka, PhysOrg.com
A team of researchers with the Center of Planetary Science (CPS) has finally solved the mystery of the “Wow!” signal from 1977. It was a comet, they report, one that that was unknown at the time of the signal discovery. Lead researcher Antonio Paris describes their theory and how the team proved it in a paper published in the Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences.

By: RealClearScience – Homepage
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2r2xswa

Lifelike Bird Pins Embroidered by Paulina Bartnik

Warsaw-based embroidery artist Paulina Bartnik stitches colorfully lifelike brooches of birds and other tiny creatures in a dense style called needle painting. Each object begins as a piece of wool which she prods with a special needle in a process called dry felting which results in a surface ideal for embroidery. She then paints with a needle directly on the felt and embroiders the finer details. You can see more of her creations in her Etsy shop. (via Bored Panda)

By: Colossal
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2sPadSz

One of the Earliest Popularly-Published Eyewitness Accounts of the Armenian Genocide (1916)

Horrors of AleppoThis is a well-traveled pamphlet1, its face showing its miles.

The author, the “German Eyewitness”, was Dr. Martin Niepage2, a school instructor at Aleppo, who wrote what was to become (apparently) the first popularly-published account in the West of the Armenian Genocide.  The pamphlet was published in 1916 and begins the story in 1915, getting quickly to the terror stories of chopped-off children’s hands. 

“In April 1915 the Ottoman government embarked upon the systematic decimation of its civilian Armenian population. The persecutions continued with varying intensity until 1923 when the Ottoman Empire ceased to exist and was replaced by the Republic of Turkey. The Armenian population of the Ottoman state was reported at about two million in 1915. An estimated one million had perished by 1918, while hundreds of thousands had become homeless and stateless refugees. By 1923 virtually the entire Armenian population of Anatolian Turkey had disappeared.”–Armenian Genocide Organization

The full text is located at archive.org  http://j.mp/2qJk681

From the Niepage text:

 
"When I returned to Aleppo in September, 1915, 
from a three months' holiday at Beirout,
I heard with horror that a new phase of Armenian massacres had begun which were far more terrible than the earlier massacres under Abd-ul- Hamid, and which aimed at exterminating, root and branch, the intelligent, industrious, and progressive Armenian nation, and at transferring its property to Turkish hands." "Such monstrous news left me at first in- credulous. I was told that, in various quarters of Aleppo, there were lying masses of half- starved people, the survivors of so-called " de- portation convoys." In order, I was told, to cover the extermination of the Armenian nation with a political cloak, mihtary reasons were being put forward, which were said to make it neces- sary to drive the Armenians out of their native seats, which had been theirs for 2,500 years, and to deport them to the Arabian deserts. I was also told that individual Armenians had lent themselves to acts of espionage." After I had informed myself about the facts and had made enquiries on all sides, I came to the conclusion that all these accusations against the Armenians were, in fact, based on trifling provocations, which were taken as an excuse for slaughtering 10,000 innocents for one guilty- person, for the most savage outrages against women and children, and for a campaign of starvation against the exiles which was intended to exterminate the whole nation."

 

Notes:

  1. Martin Niepage. The Horrors of Aleppo… Seen by a German Eyewitness. A word to Germany’s Accredited Representatives by Dr. Martin Niepage, Higher Grade Teacher in the German Technical School at Aleppo, at present at Wernigerode. T. Fisher Unwin, London, (1916). 185x120mm, 24pp. Original wrappers. Provenance: Army Medical Library (in 1935), and then the Library of Congress. There are cataloging notes on the front cover, as well as a “withdrawn for Exchange” Army Medical stamp and a “surplus” LC rubber stamp (that on the rear cover).

    2. Martin Niepage was a teacher of the German Realschule in Aleppo from 1913 to 1916. Niepage had tried to stop the massacres from happening by appealing to the local German authorities in order “to put a stop to the brutality with which the wives and children of slaughtered Armenians are being treated here”. He also indicated that the campaign of forceful starvation was just one of the methods employed to annihilate the Armenian nation all together. Martin Niepage wrote an account of his experiences in Aleppo entitled The Horrors of Aleppo. Niepage was later sentenced to death in absentia by the Turkish government for publishing the account.’–“Witnesses and testimonies of teh Armenia Genocide”, http://j.mp/2rshHM6

 

By: JF Ptak Science Books
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/2qJi7AA