Category Archives: Flickr

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Book of Hours, Ysengrin the wolf as bishop, Walters Manuscript W.102, fol. 78r detail

This is a finely illuminated and iconographically rich Book of Hours, made in England at the end of the thirteenth century. The manuscript is incomplete and misbound. Its main artist can also be found at work in a Bible, Oxford, Bodleian Library Ms. Auct. D.3.2, and a Psalter, Cambridge, Trinity College Cambridge Ms. O.4.16. The manuscript contains a number of unusual texts including the Hours of Jesus Crucified, and the Office of St. Catherine. The patron of the manuscript is not clear: a woman is depicted as praying in many of the initials, but rubrics in the Office of the Dead mention "freres". The imagery is marvellously inventive, and the Hours of Christ Crucified are graced with images depicting the Funeral of Reynard the Fox in its margins. In the absence of a Calendar, it is not possible to locate the origin of the manuscript precisely.

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How to make a sketchbook

After searching many years for the perfect sketchbook, I finally gave up on the commercial brands and decided to make my own. For weeks I stayed up all night tearing paper, threading needles, poking holes in mat boards, and utilizing all kinds of gadgets, until finally I created the sketchbook I had been searching for. Here are the steps I used to make my favorite sketchbook.

1) Measure out and tear (using the side of a ruler) a full sheet (22" x 30") of Arches watercolor paper into eight, 7.5" x 11" sheets (a full sheet is actually 22.5 inches wide so the individual pieces will be 11.25" long including the deckle edge). Make sure the paper’s front side is up (watermark is readable on front side). Repeat until 4 full sheets have been torn into a total of 32, 7.5" x 11" sheets. (more…)

Neil Armstrong’s Moon Boot Prints

Remember the closeup picture of Armstrong’s imprinted footprint on the moon? These struck me as ethereal echoes, anticipatory foot prints from the adventurous arc of exploration.

Something about it just draws me in. I can imagine them glowing from a diffused backlight.

A vintage 11”x 14” X-ray of Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong’s lunar EVA spacesuit boots dated 7-7-69, only 9 days before the launch. Excellent condition. This X-ray was taken as a last minute check to see if there were any foreign objects that could compromise the integrity of the spacesuit during the mission, such as broken off tips of needles that were used in the stitching process. The X-ray was taken and inspected at the time by a man named Jack Weakland, who stored it for NASA during and after the Apollo program.

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“12 August 1916”

110mm x 80mm photograph. Note on reverse (title).

Monet once travelled to London to see smog on the Thames. Dürer once risked six days on a freezing boat to paint a whale washed up on a beach. Artists such as Chardin and Morandi rarely left their studios, finding everything they needed at home. This painter has dropped by a Feldluftschiffer unit to paint one of their Parseval-Siegsfeld observation balloons.

By ✠ drakegoodman ✠

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How to make a sketchbook

After searching many years for the perfect sketchbook, I finally gave up on the commercial brands and decided to make my own. For weeks I stayed up all night tearing paper, threading needles, poking holes in mat boards, and utilizing all kinds of gadgets, until finally I created the sketchbook I had been searching for. Here are the steps I used to make my favorite sketchbook.

1) Measure out and tear (using the side of a ruler) a full sheet (22" x 30") of Arches watercolor paper into eight, 7.5" x 11" sheets (a full sheet is actually 22.5 inches wide so the individual pieces will be 11.25" long including the deckle edge). Make sure the paper’s front side is up (watermark is readable on front side). Repeat until 4 full sheets have been torn into a total of 32, 7.5" x 11" sheets. (more…)

Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr.1 / Schwertschlucker

Divided reverse. No correspondence.

"An anatomical miracle that appeared for 15 days in Berlin theaters and for 1 month in Circus Schumann – With x-ray and photograph."

A talented member of Kaiser Alexander Garde-Grenadier-Regiment Nr.1 demonstrates his gift for sword swallowing by downing a Hirschfänger – a long, double-edged hunting knife used to kill deer and boar.

_____________________________________________________________________
Notes:

http://j.mp/1BoSJJ9

By ✠ drakegoodman ✠

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The dance of death: the fight is over and death is seen

V0042040 The dance of death: the fight is over and death is seen seat
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
wellcomeimages.org
The dance of death: the fight is over and death is seen seated, enthroned on ruins composed of rubble and the dead. Drawing.
Published: –

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://j.mp/1wOAe1u

By wellcome images

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The dance of death: the masquerade. Coloured aquatint b

V0041985 The dance of death: the masquerade. Coloured aquatint by T.
Credit: Wellcome Library, London. Wellcome Images
images@wellcome.ac.uk
wellcomeimages.org
The dance of death: the masquerade. Coloured aquatint by T. Rowlandson, 1816.
1816 By: Thomas RowlandsonPublished: –

Copyrighted work available under Creative Commons Attribution only licence CC BY 4.0 http://j.mp/1wOAe1u

By wellcome images

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December 12, 1930

Artistic display of meat products from Irish Co-operative Meat Ltd., Waterford to tempt the palate in the run up to Christmas 1930. So we have sausages, black and white pudding (or maybe brawn?), and lard. The packaging on the lard proudly declares that it is "guaranteed perfectly pure" and "untouched by human hand". It cost 1/6.

(Virtual) 1lb. of sausages to anyone who can tell me the address for the meat factory in the 1930s, so I can add it to our Flickr map!

Date: 12 December 1930

NLI Ref.: P_WP_3770

By National Library of Ireland on The Commons

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