Tagged: 50 Watts

Space Teriyaki 7

Visions of space and the future in Japan in the 70s and 80s
See the full series.

Gan Hosoya, 1973, “Silence” poster

The standard spiel:What you are seeing here is a selection of scans from my still-growing stash of books and catalogs on Japanese illustration and design.

I apologize for the stupid series name. I didn’t realize it would be a series when I did the first post on a whim three years ago. I may airbrush it out at some point.

Ikuo Niida, 1975, record cover

Tadami Yamada, c.1975

Genpei Akasegawa, c.1975

Koichi Sato, 1986, Housing Company Calendar

Hajime Sorayama, c.1975

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hisashi Saito, 1983, catalog illustration

Hiroshi Morishima, 1985, handmade folding screens

Katsuji Isaka, c.1975

Kazuyuki Goto, c.1975

Masatoshi Toda, 1986, poster

Mitsuo Katsui, 1986, poster

Mitsuo Katsui, 1986, poster

Sadao Sato, 1983, original work

Goto Shimaoka, 1981, poster

Kenkichi Satao, early 80s
(one of these per installment, 4eva)

Yusaku Kamekura, 1986, poster

Tadanori Yokoo, 1976, Amnesty International Poster

See the full series
This post first appeared on April 14, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Space-Teriyaki-7

Richard Teschner and His Puppets

Though I’ve featured many illustrations and prints by Richard Teschner, until now I hadn’t found nice-sized images of his legendary puppets. Enjoy.

Richard Teschner with his puppets, 1914

Most of the photos in this post are copyright of the Theater Museum in Vienna, which is holding a large exhibit on Teschner through April 21, 2014.
Repeating from an earlier post:Richard Teschner (1879, Bohemia—1948, Vienna) made prints and illustrated books in turn-of-the-century Prague, hanging out with writers like Meyrink and Paul Leppin and exhibiting with Hugo Steiner-Prag.

He finally settled in Vienna and devoted himself to the puppet theater. Brittanica says he “developed the artistic potentialities of the Javanese rod puppet for western puppet theatre.” I’ll keep digging! (For instance, someone needs to comb through this archive of his puppets.) [update: some photos of Teschner's puppets here.]

The Princess, from “Prinzessin und Wassermann,” 1913

From the Theater Museum: “In techniques for rod-puppets, Richard Teschner (1879–1948) set new standards. Teschner, one of the most notable representatives of Viennese art nouveau, was a man of exceptionally diverse gifts: he was a painter, graphic designer, sculptor, puppeteer and much more. With his revolutionary theatre of figures, he created an integrated theatrical work of art encompassing everything from puppets to plays, stagecraft and incidental music. Using the Javanese rod-puppets as his model, he developed a new, expressive puppet variety for his pantomimic plays. Overcoming the traditional proscenium stage led to the unique round of the Figure Mirror, which gave rise to images of great beauty and suggestive effect.”

“Zipizip,” 1913
You might recognize this creature from my post Teschner’s Musket

“Fur devil,” 1913
via the Münchner Stadtmuseum

“Nachtstück,” 1913

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

“Basilisk” from Der Basilisk, 1937

Dragon, 1928

“Der Graue, Hörnchen aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Der Gelbe aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Der Rote aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Bologneser Hündchen” from Karneval, 1929

Wassermann from “Prinzessin und Wassermann,” 1913

another Zipizip

I think this is a frame from a movie version of Karneval

“Die Lebens-Uhr,” 1935

“Künstlerlegende”, 1928

Teschner in his workshop, 1941

exhibit poster

Previously:
Etchings of a Puppeteer
Master of Puppet Masters
Teschner’s Musket
This post first appeared on April 8, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Richard-Teschner-and-His-Puppets

The Thing from Denmark

20 Movie Posters from Denmark, circa 1926–64

Swing Time (1936)
signed: Erik F.

I’ve done three posts of vintage Swedish movie posters, but this is my first (and probably last) post of Danish posters. Kurt Wenzel and Erik F. (Erik Frederiksen) seemed to illustrate many Danish posters. The reproductions are from expired auction listings at ha.com. Heritage doesn’t have many to choose from (unlike the Swedish posters), and almost all of them are stamped by the Danish censor board (which makes me think they came from a single collection).

Greed (1926)

Kiss of Death (1947)

Last Warning (1929)

The Thing from Another World (1951)

The War of the Worlds (1954)
signed: Wenzel

King Kong (poster, 1948)
signed: Boye

The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

Pearls of the Crown (1937)
signed: Rodian T.

Dark Victory (1939)

Leave Her to Heaven (1948)
signed: Willy

Suspicion (1948)
Looks like Wenzel again

The 39 Steps (1960)
signed: Wenzel

The Puritan (Early 1940s)
signed: Ruthwenn Eriksen

Chamber of Horrors (1947)
signed: Erik F.

The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb (1964)

The Gay Divorcee (1934)
signed: Erik F.

Maciste in Hell (1927)
signed: Wenzel
I would have guessed a much later date for this poster

The Night of the Hunter (1955)
signed: Wenzel

Sunset Boulevard (1951)
signed: ByS?

This post first appeared on April 7, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/The-Thing-from-Denmark

Light Issued Against Ruin

Herbert Pfostl, “one lives in the hope of becoming a memory”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

These are images from Herbert Pfostl’s new book and exhibit “Light Issued Against Ruin.” The book was published by The Brother in Elysium in an edition of 300 copies and the exhibit starts Friday.Book Release & Show Friday, March 28th 6-10pm

The Brother In Elysium is proud to announce its new publication of recent works on paper by Herbert Pfostl. There will be a book release & show of all of the original artwork in the publication at 222 Roebling Street on Friday, March 28 from 6-10pm. The work will also be on view Saturday, March 29th from noon-5pm.

Light Issued Against Ruin is a handmade artist book made in a trade edition of 300 copies. Artwork printed 4-color offset with all text hand set and printed letterpress. Each copy has been sewn and bound into letterpress printed wrappers. Publication price of $40. Purchase here.

222 Roebling Street Brooklyn NY – Ground level studio.
Located off the Bedford L & Marcy J train stops.
Herbert has been a friend from the earliest days of A Journey Round My Skull (we bonded over Hans Henny Jahnn). I find this new work stunning.

Herbert Pfostl, “mondkreis”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “ordnungen”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard

Herbert Pfostl, "from everlasting to everlasting"
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “been listening all the day”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “sommerfriedhof”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “could stand to see you die”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “side by side”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “Bildnis Hans Henny Jahnn”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Two works made around the same time as the ones in the book:
Herbert Pfostl, “gathering up”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “of deposited lands”
[artist's sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Previously: All Sorts of Remedies

This post first appeared on March 26, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Light-Issued-Against-Ruin

Kling Klang Gloria: Vintage Children’s Books from Austria

circa 1897–1928
Franz Wacik, illustrated cover for Wiener Kinder 1. Buch, 1923
See my June 2013 post on Franz Wacik
From the catalog: “The first primer to appear in Vienna according to the requirements of the Social Democratic school reform. Franz Wacik, who was commissioned to illustrate this book, was already well-known as an artist. Published in many editions, the primer—its exterior already signalling clarity and contemporary self-awareness—is now considered a key work of interwar primer art.”

Most of these scans come from the book Jugendschatz und Wunderscherlein: Book Art for Children in Vienna 1890–1938 (text in German and English; Amaz link). The book accompanied a 2009 exhibit at the “works on paper” arm of the Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna.
For an excellent overview of the book, read Helen Chang’s piece for Design Observer. Here’s the publisher’s description:From the end of the 19th century to 1938, many children’s books of artistic importance were published in Vienna. This publication is devoted to this special genre of book art, which at that time ranked in importance alongside architecture, painting, literature, music and theatre.

The illustrations of notable artists such as C. O. Czeschka, Heinrich Lefler, Bertold Loffler, Koloman Moser, as well as those of numerous, talented—though as yet unknown—graphic artists are evidence of the variety of high quality works produced.

Moreover, the selected children’s books, divided into four chapters (I. From Monarchy to Republic, II. Bourgeois Life, III. The Modern World, IV. New Teaching Methods) can be seen in the political, social and economic context concerned.

As part of daily culture, they reflect contemporary realities and utopias, which at this stage are still revealed to children by means of the ‘picture book’. In a fifth chapter (V. Art for Children – Children’s Art), aesthetic developments and artistic possibilities of expression are put into visual form.

The historical children’s book in particular reveals impressively individual artistic craftsmanship, and styles and modes typical of particular epochs.

Based on around one hundred works, the publication charts not only the history of the development of the modern children’s book in Vienna, but also that of the modern book art overall.

A handful of the scans come from the harder-to-find Wien und Berlin: Zwei Metropolen im Spiegel des Kinderbuchs 1870–1945 (worldcat) and a handful from various online sources.

Wenzel Oswald, illus. for Himmlische Mär by Leo Blonder, 1914
According to a Swiss bookseller in 2009: “Spectacular children’s book uniting the work of two artists of the Wiener Werkstätte. This book is of the utmost rarity in any form and has never come up for auction in the past 30 years; we only know of one other copy of the deluxe edition in private hands. $12,500.”

Heinrich Lefler, illus. for Die Bucher der Chronika der drei Schwestern, 1900

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908
full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908
full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Wiener Werkstatte Bilderbogen, 1907 (M Jung?)

Adelheid Malecki, Mein Herz gehort meinen Volkern, 1913

Class of Franz Cizek, Jugendkunstklasse, 1922

Anna Lesznai, Die Reise des Kleinen Schmetterlings…, 1912
Read a short bio of this Hungarian artist here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910, cover

Teschner keeps popping up everywhere I turn. See three 50 Watts posts on him here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910
this image from the collection of Amélie Ziersch

Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel, Tierfabeln des klassischen Altertums, 1919

Lore Bohler, School of Emmy Zweybruck, 1924

Ferdinand Andri, Ausgewahlte Gedichte, 1904

Alfred Zangerl, Zirkus, 1925

signed Steffi Krauss
Weihnacht, Vienna, 1922

Risa Bernt, illus. for Unser Franzi by Nelly Goebel, 1908

Lilly Jacobsen, etc., Leporello Bilderbuch Blumenstrauss, 1919

Maria Grengg for Marie Von Ebner-Eschenbach, 1917

Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban, Kling Klang Gloria, 1907

Heinrich Lefler, Die Prinzessin und der Schweinehirt, 1897
The clear inspiration for Einar Nerman’s Swineherd.
The catalog says these illustrations “mark the beginning of modern book art in Vienna.”

Joseph Binder, Indianermarchen, 1921

Class of Adolf Bohm, Bilderbuch der Kunstschule fur Frauen und Madchen, 1901

Richard Rothe, Das Marlein vom Wunderscherlein, 1926

Otto Schubert, Hoch die Republik, 1928

See the full “Kinderbuch series” of German, Austrian, and Swiss children’s books
See all children’s books on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Kling-Klang-Gloria-Vintage-Children-s-Books-from-Austria

Ex Libris Mr. Reaper (11)

Bookplates from the collection of Richard Sica
Leonid Stroganov (Russian, b. 1979)
Max Švabinský (Czech, 1873–1962)
F. S. Coburn (Canadian, 1871–1960)
Vladimir Suchánek (Czech, b. 1933)
Jrisdu (?)
Fritz Gilsi (Swiss, 1878–1961)
Henry Chapsony (?)
Harry Jurgens (Estonian, lives and works in Germany, b. 1949)
See all bookplate posts on 50 Watts (including parts 1 through 10 of this series).
This post first appeared on

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Ex-Libris-Mr-Reaper-11

Harry Clarke Revisited

Works by the great Irish illustrator Harry Clarke, circa 1910–1930
1913, for “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”
(“The souls did from their bodies fly”)
I put this post together in October 2012 and for some reason never unleashed it—better late than never. If I remember correctly most of these scans come from Nicola Bowe’s The Life and Work of Harry Clarke.
From James White’s preface to the Bowe book, here is Clarke’s eldest son Michael discussing his father:”…the priests did make an indelible mark on every sensitive child who listened with care: he would have a grim understanding of the quality of hell and an idealised version of an improbable Paradise. Thus Harry Clarke would carry into the world a comforting picture of the glories of salvation joined inevitably to a fascination with the terror of damnation which had particular bearing on those matters of sensual indulgence which his masters constantly trumpeted as a major road to eternal fire. He would never be a devout Catholic, but would never decry it in others. Much of religion in which he did not believe he found aesthetically pleasing. The peripheral rules he found an irritation. The deeper mysteries filled him with awe.”
Also: “Michael has described how his father loved swimming with them, organizing games of all sorts, and would write them amusing letters enclosing illustrations and altered photographs signed with the melancholy nom-de-plume J. Sick…”
See all Harry Clarke posts on 50 Watts
1915, for “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”
1913, for De Profundis (Wilde)
1920, “Out on the wind of Time, shining and streaming,” illustration to Rupert Brooke’s “The Great Lover”
1925, Faust and Mephistopheles, end-piece to Faust
detail
1914, Hibernia, calendar design for an insurance company
1923, Christmas card
1917, cover for fifth exhibition of Arts and Crafts Society
1925, unpublished illus. of Garden scene in Faust
1928, design for panel, Geneva Window, based on Yeats’ “Countess Cathleen”
1924, illus. for Clemence Dane, Women Voters and the Death Penalty, Good Housekeeping
1924, The Devil’s Wife and her Eldest
1925, Dublin Drama League
detail
1913, Silver Apples of the Moon
1925, Ophelia (or Lobster), after Hokusai
1913, The Dream, Pope, The Rape of Lock, 1913
1925, Mephistopheles, for Faust (misshapen bodies with wormlike heads)
1925, The Street, from Faust
1925, The Two Distilleries on the Same Hill, for Warren, Elixir of Life
c. 1920, untitled
1917, The Mad Mulrannies, Synge’s Playboy of the Western World
1922, The Last Hour of the Night, illus. to Dublin of the Future
1923, cover for Lennox Robinson’s plays
Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination illustration, mixed media on paper
detail
1923, from dustjacket for Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination
1923, first US edition of Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination
caricature self portrait in medieval garret
See all Harry Clarke posts on 50 Watts
This post first appeared on October 30, 2013 on 50 Watts.

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21 Vintage Political Posters from Cuba

Cuban OSPAAAL posters from the archives of Michael Tylor, a collector from Bath, EnglandMike has a number of duplicates to offer in exchange for a few elusive posters he’s trying to find. You can reach him at m_w_tyler [at] hotmail [dot] com

1969, poster by Rafael Zarsa, Day of Solidarity with the People of Laos
From the collection of Michael Tyler

From wikipedia:The Organization of Solidarity with the People of Asia, Africa and Latin America (Organización de Solidaridad con los Pueblos de Asia, África y América Latina), abbreviated as OSPAAAL, is a Cuban political movement with the stated purpose of fighting globalisation, imperialism, neoliberalism and defending human rights.
[...]
From its foundation until the mid-1980s, OSPAAAL produced brightly coloured propaganda posters promoting their cause, however, financial difficulty and ink shortages forced the organization to stop producing these posters. However, in 2000, these posters began to be printed again.

These posters, as they intended to be internationalist, usually had their message written in Spanish, English, French, and Arabic. As opposed to being put up on walls around Cuba, these posters were instead folded up and stapled into copies of Tricontinental, so that they could be distributed internationally. This allowed OSPAAAL to send its message to its subscribers around the world.

1969, poster by Faustino Perez, Day of Solidarity with Venezuela
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1968, poster by Faustino Perez, Day of Solidarity with the People of Palestine
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by René Mederos, Day of solidarity with the struggle of the people of South Africa
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1975, poster by Lazaro Abreu, Queens House of Detention
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1971, poster by Ernesto Padron, Together with Vietnam
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1968, poster by Daysi Garcia, Day of Solidarity with the Afro American People
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by Alfredo Rostgaard, Santo Domingo 1965
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1969, poster by Guilermo Menendez, Day of solidarity with the Japanese People
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by Faustino Pérez, Day of solidarity with Zimbabwe
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by Lazaro Abreu, Day of solidarity with the Arab Peoples of Syria
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1968, poster by Alfredo Rostgaard, Democracy Representative
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1968, poster by Alfredo Rostgaard, Tricontinental Conference 3rd Anniversary
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1969, poster by Daysi Garcia, Day of solidarity with Angola
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1971, poster by Daysi Garcia, Sekou Toure
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1978, poster by Olivio Martinez, Day of the Heroic Guerilla
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by Asela Perez, Solidarity with Latin America
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1968, poster by Berta Abelenda, Day of Solidarity with Palestine
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1969, designer unknown, For an Independant South Yemen
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1970, poster by Lazaro Abreu,
Day of world solidarity with the people of so-called Portuguese Guinea and Cape Verde
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1972, poster by Alfredo Rostgaard, Nixon
From the collection of Michael Tyler

1972, poster by Alfredo Rostgaard, Nixon (unfolded)
From the collection of Michael Tyler

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/21-Vintage-Political-Posters-from-Cuba

Marcus Behmer

Illustrations by Marcus Behmer (1879–1958) circa 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, 1901
I became fascinated by Marcus Behmer and his snoot-snout and big-beak creatures after seeing one of his bookplates in 2009 and posts of his work at feuilleton and The Cabinet of the Solar Plexus. (In 2011 I re-hashed feuilleton’s work for a post on But Does it Float.) When I saw the image above in one of John’s features on Ver Sacrum I knew I’d have to post it myself sooner or later.
Most of the images here come from Ver Sacrum, “the art journal of the Viennese Secession,” published from 1898 to 1903. See the complete archive. A few come from Simplicissimus and a few from auction listings.
The only biographical information in English I could find is Oliver Tepel’s account of the artist’s life for an exhibit at Galerie Daniel Buchholz:Fascinated by the book art of Charles Ricketts and directly influenced by Aubrey Beardsley’s revolution is in the field of illustration, Marcus Behmer starts out at the turn of the 19th century as an autodidact. He soon liberates himself from Art Nouveau and, parallel to Expressionism that was just emerging and to the new impulses from the Wiener Werkstätte in Vienna, develops his own inimitable formal idiom. In his native Weimar he catches the eye of the legendary Harry Graf Kessler. Behmer draws, writes and designs books (for Kessler’s Cranach Press, but above all for the publisher Insel) developing a style of engraving that was both absolutely precise and astonishingly personal. He achieves a degree of fame in the bibliophile circles that keep abreast of the beginnings of Modernism. At the start of his career everything seems possible for Behmer, he makes early comic books, creates a language of ornament all of his own, and produces writings and pictures of astonishing comic imaginativeness and sexual frankness. But as early as the twenties Behmer suffers from the crisis in the field of the art book, and consequently from his unwavering dedication to the small format. While his book illustrations for Oscar Wilde’s “La Sainte Courtisane”, Hermann Bang’s “Exzentrische Novellen” (Eccentric Novellas) and above all Phillip Otto Runge’s “Von dem Fischer und syner Fru” (Of the Fisherman and his Wife) are highly regarded internationally, his visibly freer graphic works continue to disappear into a cultural black hole which swallows up almost all Modernist illustrators. He is still sufficiently visible however to come up on the National Socialists’ radar, and in 1937 they imprisoned Behmer, who was living openly as a homosexual, for two years. [continue reading]
Also check out the tantalizing installation views at the gallery. I wish I could take a look at some of these books!

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, “Karnevals Begräbnis” from Simplicissimus, 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Simplicissimus, 1901

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, “Faust und Wagner,” Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer, Simplicissimus, 1900

Marcus Behmer, from Ver Sacrum, c. 1900

Marcus Behmer for Balzac, “Das Mädchen mit den Goldaugen” (The Girl With the Golden Eyes), 1904

See a set of Behmer’s Salome illustrations at The Peacock Skirt

Marcus Behmer, “Das Ungerheuer”

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Marcus-Behmer

Modern Sketch

Illustrations from the 1930s Chinese magazine Modern Sketch

Modern Sketch issue #9
Chen Juanyin, “China’s Characters Who Count” (#1, Chiang Kai-shek…)
For the full background on this remarkable publication read John A Crespi’s essay “China’s Modern Sketch: The Golden Era of Cartoon Art, 1934-1937″ at MIT Visualizing Cultures. Every issue can be seen in high resolution at Colgate Digital Collections — they made the scans.
From MIT Visualizing Cultures: Modern Sketch stands out among the nearly 20 illustrated humor and satire magazines that proliferated in mid-1930s Shanghai. One can point to the remarkable openness and eclecticism of its content, and its inclusion of work by young artists who went on to become leaders in China’s 20th-century cultural establishment. Most intriguing, however, is the kaleidoscopic window onto the past that Modern Sketch provides. Without doubt the illustrations populating its pages lend blunt visual force to the major crises and contradictions that define China’s 20th century as a quintessentially modern era.
I included artist’s names and translations when possible.

Hu Kao, “Swimsuits of 1934” (issue 7, July 1934)Crespi: “Designed to define Modern Sketch in the eyes of readers, the magazine’s full-color front covers offer a convenient point of entry into its diverse subjects and styles. What strikes the viewer’s eye now, as it surely did in the 1930s, is a consistent theme of eroticism. Nude or semi-nude figures were undoubtedly displayed to titillate the potential buyer. Yet during the first decades of the Republican period nudity could also project positive symbolic values, such as freedom, liberation, and physical health—all tropes aimed at counteracting representations of China as the tradition-bound, feeble, ‘Sick Man of Asia.’”

Sheng Gongmu (Te Wei), “The Borderlands”Crespi: “Many streams of artistic influence fed the imagery of Modern Sketch. Where representations of the ‘modern girl’ and ‘modern boy’ drew mainly from stylish American jazz-age magazine illustration, other cartoonists picked and chose from among modern-art movements like cubism, surrealism, fauvism, and dada. Few rules applied to the young, almost totally uninstitutionalized art of Chinese cartooning, and the results could be fascinatingly grotesque.”

Ye Qianyu, “Supply Exceeds Demand, Demand Exceeds Supply”

Some of these can be viewed larger by clicking:
Fullscreen

Yan Zhexi, “Nothing of the Sort!”

Weng Xingqing, “A World of Lines”

Shang Ban Yu, “Bacteria from the ‘Sick Man of Asia’ at 2000x Magnification”

“Lineup of the World’s Dictators: Saint Fascista and His Disciples”Crespi: “…Modern Sketch did much more than react to big national and global events. Due to the vision of its editor, Lu Shaofei, the collective pictorial imagination of Modern Sketch probed all corners of the modern era, beyond and below the big stories of politics, economics, Shanghai, and even China.”

Hu Kao, “The Perfect Life of Leisure!” (clockwise from top left)
— Ain’t no time for learning in the gusty old fall,
Woo woo…chee chee…a shoo shoo shoo…
— Ain’t no time for books in the warm and breezy spring,
Pa pa…doo doo…a go go go
— Ain’t no time for homework in the scorching summer,
Wah wah…lah lah…a yeah yeah yeah
— Ain’t no time to study on those chilly winter nights,
Dah dah…bom bom…a lah lah lah…

Huang Weiqiang, “The Internationalized Hong Kong Meat Market”

Chinese opera character drawn by a child (Chen Keyan) for this 1935 cover

cover by Huang Yao featuring his signature character

Crespi: “Zhang Guangyu’s cheerful January 1935 contribution commemorated the Republican government’s Year of Children…”

Pang Xunqin, “Aquatic Life”

“World Peace News Service: ‘Portrait of the Chief of the Economic Survey Team,
Kodama Kenji, during His Visit to China’”

Chen Paixi, “Official Malfeasance among the Cantonese Gentry”

“Compassion for the World”
[The Pope:] The Lord Shall Provide

Ye Qianyu, “The Second-class Rail Carriage”

Ye Qianyu, cover of the second issue
So many of the illustrations have a strong Grosz influence

Yu Yongpeng, “Competing Vehicles”

Yu Yongpeng, “Repairing a Rich Man’s Head”
Instructions: The face is painted green to facilitate malingering. The scalp is lubricated to slip out of tight situations. The eyes are different colors for sizing up different sorts of characters. The ears are nailed shut to help shirk responsibility. The teeth are sharp and the tongue coated with honey as an aid to persuasion. But little does the rich man know how the small-timers leech off of him!

Cover of the first issueCrespi: “Equal parts comic and gallant, this strange horseman heralded the arrival of the longest running and most influential humor and satire magazine in China during the first half of the 20th century: Shidai manhua, or by its English name, Modern Sketch. Published monthly for 39 issues from 1934 through June 1937, Modern Sketch was recognized then, and still is now, as the centerpiece of China’s golden era of cartoon art.”

A sequel to this post is in the works.
See all posts tagged “China”

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Modern-Sketch