Tagged: 50 Watts

30 Vintage Movie Posters from Japan

Kiyoshi Awazu, poster for Double Suicide, 1969 (Awazu on 50 Watts)

Medea (1971)

Kurosawa’s own artwork for Dodes’ka-den (Clickety Clack), 1970

Kurosawa’s own artwork for Dodes’ka-den (Clickety Clack), 1970

“Young Miss” (Ojo san) movie poster, 1930
via Pink Tentacle

The four posters from the sorely missed Pink Tentacle come from the Japanese-language book Modernism on Paper: Japanese Graphic Design of the 1920s-30s.

“May 1″ movie poster by Hiromu Hara, 1928-1929
via Pink Tentacle

Tadanori Yokoo’s poster for Diary of a Shinjuku Thief, 1969
via Gurafiku

For a Few Dollars More, 1967

A Fistful of Dollars, 1965

Shoot the Piano Player, 1960

Masculin Féminin, 1966
via Zero Focus

The Birds, 1963

Repulsion, 1965

House, 1977
via Gurafiku

Symphonie der Liebe, 1949

Ecstasy, 1930s

Kriemhild’s Revenge, 1925
via Pink Tentacle

In Old Arizona, 1929

Rififi, 1955

Les Enfants Terribles, 1960s

Django

Onibaba, 1964

Pokolenie, 1981

Play it Again, Sam, 1972

Fantastic Voyage, 1966

The 1,000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse, 1960

The Ghoul, 1933

c.1930s

“An intriguing piece of film history. Bound together in this unique volume is a collection of promotional material (mainly, ‘Chirashi’), touting American films released in Japan in the early 1930s.”

Kuroneko, 1968

Wild Bunch, 1969

Magazine ad for “Seishun Zukai” movie, 1931
via Pink Tentacle

The majority of the scans here are from expired auction listings at Heritage Auctions (ha.com). There’s a whole blog of them too at JapaneseMoviePosters.
I put some Japanese horror movie posters on my tumblr. (Including one which makes Michael Myers look like a Simpsons character.)
This post first appeared on June 9, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://j.mp/1mxlVXy

Walter Schnackenberg 5

Another harvest of images from one of my favorite artists, Walter Schnackenberg (1880–1961). I’m starting to wonder if a proper book overview of his work will even be published in my lifetime.
I pulled most of the images from various expired auction or bookseller listings of the rare publication Kostume / Plakate Und Dekorationen. It’s currently selling for $4000 online so I’m satisfied with these somewhat scrappy photos and scans. It includes “31 color lithograph plates, eight photographic plates and five black and white plates of poster, advertising and costume design.”
See all my posts on Schnackenberg

from Jugend

from Jugend

costume designs!

costume designs!

costume designs!

in his studio with model

for Jugend 1915

for Jugend 1915

See all my posts on Schnackenberg
Repeated from the first post (Sept. 2008):
There doesn’t seem to be much info on him on the web. Here’s a bio from the non-site walterschnackenberg.com: Born in Bad Lauterburg in 1880, Walter Schnackenberg found his vocation as a draughtsman and painter while still very young. At 19 he went to Munich, where he at first attended Heinrich Knirr’s painting school before going on directly, like so many of his contemporaries, to study at the Franz von Stuck Academy. Drawing is Schnackenberg’s strong point. His lively imagination made him particularly good at caricature. He drew for the celebrated magazines ‘Jugend’ and ‘Simplizissimus’. His themes were theatre and the comic muse. Travelling extensively, Schnackenberg often went to Paris, where he was especially interested in the work of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. As a print-maker, Schnackenberg devoted himself mainly to poster art and his most mature work is in this genre. He was also well-known as a designer of stage scenery and costumes. With his evident preference for frivolous ladies, he was highly fashionable in his day. Schnackenberg does not have the acutely critical approach of a Grosz or a Hubbuch. Instead, his works resemble those of Jeanne Mammen, who devoted herself to portraying pert Berlin girls. During the late phase of his career, Schnackenberg introduced surreal elements into his work. People with bestial, mask-like faces were intended to symbolize the unsatisfied lusts and addictions of the petty bourgeois. Schnackenberg spent his last years in Rosenheim and died there in 1961.

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://j.mp/1kz1AFm

Image Dive 1

illus. from an 1850s “Materia Medica” book
via Dassaishooku

I’ve decided to reboot the “Image Dive” series I did on A Journey Round My Skull in 2009 and 2010. I’ve posted a handful of these images on facebook, tumblr, or twitter in the past year.

Japanese badger from an 1850s “Materia Medica” book
via Dassaishooku

Gaston de Latenay, 1899, Nausikaa illustration
via Book Graphics

Gaston de Latenay, 1899, Nausikaa illustration
via Book Graphics

illus. by Hiromi Nishizaka via mlle ghoul

Tom Seidmann-Freud, Das Wunderhaus, 1927
via via UB Braunschweig

Previous post on Tom Seidmann-Freud: The Rabbit Dreams of Dr. Freud’s Niece

Tom Seidmann-Freud, Das Wunderhaus, 1927
via via UB Braunschweig
The book has lots of moving parts.

Dodo, from ‘Atlas de Zoologie’ 1844 by Paul Gervais
see the full post on BibliOdyssey

cover illus. by Carlos Gonzalez, 1924, Mexico

Mexican work safety poster, 1938
via Swann Auctions
50 Watts is concerned for your safety

Futuro cover, 1942, Josep Renau

from El perro, el ratón y el gato, 1930 Spain
via Memoria de Madrid
More to come from this publication, some day

“Der Rote” by frequent 50 Watts cover star Richard Teschner
via the Theater Museum

Edmund Dulac, illus. for La Toison d’Or et quelques autres Contes de la Grèce ancienne

Armand Vallee, 1926
I’m not sure of the story behind this image. The artist Christian Schumann shared it on facebook.

Faust illus. by René Clarke, 1932
via Book Graphics

Fullscreen

Marcus Behmer, c. 1900
via Swann
previous feature on Behmer

The Emperor’s New Clothes, DDR style
via the new blog Red Sails

Fumo der Rauchgeist (Fumo the Smoke Spirit) by Elfi & Kurt Wendlandt, 1962
again via Red Sails

illus. by Cesar from Le Canard enchainé
via Multiglom via BibliOdyssey’s tumblr

“Threshold” by Kevin Lucbert, 2014
website / tumblr

recent work by Josh Courlas

I featured Josh Courlas on But Does it Float a couple years ago (pretty please archive your old work Josh!)

recent work by Josh Courlas

Little Red Riding Hood, illus. by Tibor Kárpáti (Hungary, 2006)
via the International Children’s Digital Library

Little Red Riding Hood, illus. by Tibor Kárpáti (Hungary, 2006)
via the International Children’s Digital Library

by Merijn Hos

Childcraft, vol. 14, Quarrie Corporation, 1939
via ha.com

The Fabulous World of Jules Verne, Hungarian poster, 1958
via ha.com
Heritage says it is a “representation of the Czech film The Fabulous World of Jules Verne, based on the 1896 Verne novel Face the Flag. The tale is cleverly filmed in a special process which causes every image on screen to resemble an old-fashioned woodcut engraving, which the poster offered here mimics to great effect.”

Czech Planet of the Apes poster by Vatislav Hlavaty
via ha.com

Romanian Planet of the Apes poster, 1978
via ha.com

Creeping Poison movie poster, 1946, Austria
via ha.com
According to Heritage this film — also known as Schleichendes Gift — is “a post-WWII documentary about venereal disease.”

detail

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Image-Dive-1

La Grande Illusion: Vintage French Movie Posters

La Grande Illusion, c.1946
signed: Bernard Lancy
These reproductions are from expired auction listings at ha.com. The dates range from 1927 to 1981 with many posters from the 1940s.

Fantômas, 1932
artist unknown

Fantômas, 1947
artist: Jacques Fourastie

The Lodger, 1944
artist: Roger Jacquier Rojac

The Killers, 1964
artist: Guy Gérard Noël

Beauty and the Beast, 1946
artist: Jean-Denis Malclès

Eyes Without a Face, 1960
artist: Jean Mascii

Eyes Without a Face, 1960
artist: Jean Mascii

Earth Versus the Flying Saucers, 1956 artist: Georges Kerfyser

Godzilla, 1956
artist: A. Poucel

Wages of Fear, 1953
artist: Rene Ferracci

The Maltese Falcon, 1941
artist unknown

The Big Sleep, 1946
artist: Vincent Cristellys

Casablanca, 1940s
artist: Pierre Pigeot

Notorious, 1946
artist: Pierre Segogne

Scarlett Empress, 1934
artist: Roger Vacher

The Birds, 1963
artist: Boris Grinsson

The Stranger, 1945
artist: Clement Hurel

The Mysterious Rider, 1927

The Mysterious Island, 1929

Bird of Paradise, 1932
artist: Bernard Lancy

The Big Clock, 1948
artist: Boris Grisson

Miracle in Milan, 1951
artist: Boris Grinsson

Six in Paris, 1965
artist: Folon

More Folon on 50 Watts

Stalker, 1981
artist: Folon

The Holy Mountain, 1973
Previously: The Holy Mountain of Contemporary Polish Posters

This post first appeared on April 24, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/La-Grande-Illusion-Vintage-French-Movie-Posters

Space Teriyaki 7

Visions of space and the future in Japan in the 70s and 80s
See the full series.

Gan Hosoya, 1973, “Silence” poster

The standard spiel:What you are seeing here is a selection of scans from my still-growing stash of books and catalogs on Japanese illustration and design.

I apologize for the stupid series name. I didn’t realize it would be a series when I did the first post on a whim three years ago. I may airbrush it out at some point.

Ikuo Niida, 1975, record cover

Tadami Yamada, c.1975

Genpei Akasegawa, c.1975

Koichi Sato, 1986, Housing Company Calendar

Hajime Sorayama, c.1975

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hiroshi Manabe, early 70s

Hisashi Saito, 1983, catalog illustration

Hiroshi Morishima, 1985, handmade folding screens

Katsuji Isaka, c.1975

Kazuyuki Goto, c.1975

Masatoshi Toda, 1986, poster

Mitsuo Katsui, 1986, poster

Mitsuo Katsui, 1986, poster

Sadao Sato, 1983, original work

Goto Shimaoka, 1981, poster

Kenkichi Satao, early 80s
(one of these per installment, 4eva)

Yusaku Kamekura, 1986, poster

Tadanori Yokoo, 1976, Amnesty International Poster

See the full series
This post first appeared on April 14, 2014 on 50 Watts

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Source: http://50watts.com/Space-Teriyaki-7

Richard Teschner and His Puppets

Though I’ve featured many illustrations and prints by Richard Teschner, until now I hadn’t found nice-sized images of his legendary puppets. Enjoy.

Richard Teschner with his puppets, 1914

Most of the photos in this post are copyright of the Theater Museum in Vienna, which is holding a large exhibit on Teschner through April 21, 2014.
Repeating from an earlier post:Richard Teschner (1879, Bohemia—1948, Vienna) made prints and illustrated books in turn-of-the-century Prague, hanging out with writers like Meyrink and Paul Leppin and exhibiting with Hugo Steiner-Prag.

He finally settled in Vienna and devoted himself to the puppet theater. Brittanica says he “developed the artistic potentialities of the Javanese rod puppet for western puppet theatre.” I’ll keep digging! (For instance, someone needs to comb through this archive of his puppets.) [update: some photos of Teschner’s puppets here.]

The Princess, from “Prinzessin und Wassermann,” 1913

From the Theater Museum: “In techniques for rod-puppets, Richard Teschner (1879–1948) set new standards. Teschner, one of the most notable representatives of Viennese art nouveau, was a man of exceptionally diverse gifts: he was a painter, graphic designer, sculptor, puppeteer and much more. With his revolutionary theatre of figures, he created an integrated theatrical work of art encompassing everything from puppets to plays, stagecraft and incidental music. Using the Javanese rod-puppets as his model, he developed a new, expressive puppet variety for his pantomimic plays. Overcoming the traditional proscenium stage led to the unique round of the Figure Mirror, which gave rise to images of great beauty and suggestive effect.”

“Zipizip,” 1913
You might recognize this creature from my post Teschner’s Musket

“Fur devil,” 1913
via the Münchner Stadtmuseum

“Nachtstück,” 1913

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

1913 via digi.ub.uni-heidelberg.de

“Basilisk” from Der Basilisk, 1937

Dragon, 1928

“Der Graue, Hörnchen aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Der Gelbe aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Der Rote aus Nachtstück” from Karneval, 1913

“Bologneser Hündchen” from Karneval, 1929

Wassermann from “Prinzessin und Wassermann,” 1913

another Zipizip

I think this is a frame from a movie version of Karneval

“Die Lebens-Uhr,” 1935

“Künstlerlegende”, 1928

Teschner in his workshop, 1941

exhibit poster

Previously:
Etchings of a Puppeteer
Master of Puppet Masters
Teschner’s Musket
This post first appeared on April 8, 2014 on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Richard-Teschner-and-His-Puppets

The Thing from Denmark

20 Movie Posters from Denmark, circa 1926–64

Swing Time (1936)
signed: Erik F.

I’ve done three posts of vintage Swedish movie posters, but this is my first (and probably last) post of Danish posters. Kurt Wenzel and Erik F. (Erik Frederiksen) seemed to illustrate many Danish posters. The reproductions are from expired auction listings at ha.com. Heritage doesn’t have many to choose from (unlike the Swedish posters), and almost all of them are stamped by the Danish censor board (which makes me think they came from a single collection).

Greed (1926)

Kiss of Death (1947)

Last Warning (1929)

The Thing from Another World (1951)

The War of the Worlds (1954)
signed: Wenzel

King Kong (poster, 1948)
signed: Boye

The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

Pearls of the Crown (1937)
signed: Rodian T.

Dark Victory (1939)

Leave Her to Heaven (1948)
signed: Willy

Suspicion (1948)
Looks like Wenzel again

The 39 Steps (1960)
signed: Wenzel

The Puritan (Early 1940s)
signed: Ruthwenn Eriksen

Chamber of Horrors (1947)
signed: Erik F.

The Curse of the Mummy’s Tomb (1964)

The Gay Divorcee (1934)
signed: Erik F.

Maciste in Hell (1927)
signed: Wenzel
I would have guessed a much later date for this poster

The Night of the Hunter (1955)
signed: Wenzel

Sunset Boulevard (1951)
signed: ByS?

This post first appeared on April 7, 2014 on 50 Watts

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Source: http://50watts.com/The-Thing-from-Denmark

Light Issued Against Ruin

Herbert Pfostl, “one lives in the hope of becoming a memory”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

These are images from Herbert Pfostl’s new book and exhibit “Light Issued Against Ruin.” The book was published by The Brother in Elysium in an edition of 300 copies and the exhibit starts Friday.Book Release & Show Friday, March 28th 6-10pm

The Brother In Elysium is proud to announce its new publication of recent works on paper by Herbert Pfostl. There will be a book release & show of all of the original artwork in the publication at 222 Roebling Street on Friday, March 28 from 6-10pm. The work will also be on view Saturday, March 29th from noon-5pm.

Light Issued Against Ruin is a handmade artist book made in a trade edition of 300 copies. Artwork printed 4-color offset with all text hand set and printed letterpress. Each copy has been sewn and bound into letterpress printed wrappers. Publication price of $40. Purchase here.

222 Roebling Street Brooklyn NY – Ground level studio.
Located off the Bedford L & Marcy J train stops.
Herbert has been a friend from the earliest days of A Journey Round My Skull (we bonded over Hans Henny Jahnn). I find this new work stunning.

Herbert Pfostl, “mondkreis”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “ordnungen”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard

Herbert Pfostl, “from everlasting to everlasting”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “been listening all the day”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “sommerfriedhof”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “could stand to see you die”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “side by side”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “Bildnis Hans Henny Jahnn”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Two works made around the same time as the ones in the book:
Herbert Pfostl, “gathering up”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Herbert Pfostl, “of deposited lands”
[artist’s sites: Blind Pony and Paper Graveyard]

Previously: All Sorts of Remedies

This post first appeared on March 26, 2014 on 50 Watts

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Source: http://50watts.com/Light-Issued-Against-Ruin

Kling Klang Gloria: Vintage Children’s Books from Austria

circa 1897–1928
Franz Wacik, illustrated cover for Wiener Kinder 1. Buch, 1923
See my June 2013 post on Franz Wacik
From the catalog: “The first primer to appear in Vienna according to the requirements of the Social Democratic school reform. Franz Wacik, who was commissioned to illustrate this book, was already well-known as an artist. Published in many editions, the primer—its exterior already signalling clarity and contemporary self-awareness—is now considered a key work of interwar primer art.”

Most of these scans come from the book Jugendschatz und Wunderscherlein: Book Art for Children in Vienna 1890–1938 (text in German and English; Amaz link). The book accompanied a 2009 exhibit at the “works on paper” arm of the Museum of Applied Arts in Vienna.
For an excellent overview of the book, read Helen Chang’s piece for Design Observer. Here’s the publisher’s description:From the end of the 19th century to 1938, many children’s books of artistic importance were published in Vienna. This publication is devoted to this special genre of book art, which at that time ranked in importance alongside architecture, painting, literature, music and theatre.

The illustrations of notable artists such as C. O. Czeschka, Heinrich Lefler, Bertold Loffler, Koloman Moser, as well as those of numerous, talented—though as yet unknown—graphic artists are evidence of the variety of high quality works produced.

Moreover, the selected children’s books, divided into four chapters (I. From Monarchy to Republic, II. Bourgeois Life, III. The Modern World, IV. New Teaching Methods) can be seen in the political, social and economic context concerned.

As part of daily culture, they reflect contemporary realities and utopias, which at this stage are still revealed to children by means of the ‘picture book’. In a fifth chapter (V. Art for Children – Children’s Art), aesthetic developments and artistic possibilities of expression are put into visual form.

The historical children’s book in particular reveals impressively individual artistic craftsmanship, and styles and modes typical of particular epochs.

Based on around one hundred works, the publication charts not only the history of the development of the modern children’s book in Vienna, but also that of the modern book art overall.

A handful of the scans come from the harder-to-find Wien und Berlin: Zwei Metropolen im Spiegel des Kinderbuchs 1870–1945 (worldcat) and a handful from various online sources.

Wenzel Oswald, illus. for Himmlische Mär by Leo Blonder, 1914
According to a Swiss bookseller in 2009: “Spectacular children’s book uniting the work of two artists of the Wiener Werkstätte. This book is of the utmost rarity in any form and has never come up for auction in the past 30 years; we only know of one other copy of the deluxe edition in private hands. $12,500.”

Heinrich Lefler, illus. for Die Bucher der Chronika der drei Schwestern, 1900

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908
full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

C. O. Czeschka, Die Nibelungen, 1908
full set here thanks to Mattia Moretti

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Koloman Moser, sketch for Jugendschatz, 1897

Wiener Werkstatte Bilderbogen, 1907 (M Jung?)

Adelheid Malecki, Mein Herz gehort meinen Volkern, 1913

Class of Franz Cizek, Jugendkunstklasse, 1922

Anna Lesznai, Die Reise des Kleinen Schmetterlings…, 1912
Read a short bio of this Hungarian artist here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910, cover

Teschner keeps popping up everywhere I turn. See three 50 Watts posts on him here.

Richard Teschner, Tobias Immerschneller, 1910
this image from the collection of Amélie Ziersch

Ludwig Heinrich Jungnickel, Tierfabeln des klassischen Altertums, 1919

Lore Bohler, School of Emmy Zweybruck, 1924

Ferdinand Andri, Ausgewahlte Gedichte, 1904

Alfred Zangerl, Zirkus, 1925

signed Steffi Krauss
Weihnacht, Vienna, 1922

Risa Bernt, illus. for Unser Franzi by Nelly Goebel, 1908

Lilly Jacobsen, etc., Leporello Bilderbuch Blumenstrauss, 1919

Maria Grengg for Marie Von Ebner-Eschenbach, 1917

Heinrich Lefler and Joseph Urban, Kling Klang Gloria, 1907

Heinrich Lefler, Die Prinzessin und der Schweinehirt, 1897
The clear inspiration for Einar Nerman’s Swineherd.
The catalog says these illustrations “mark the beginning of modern book art in Vienna.”

Joseph Binder, Indianermarchen, 1921

Class of Adolf Bohm, Bilderbuch der Kunstschule fur Frauen und Madchen, 1901

Richard Rothe, Das Marlein vom Wunderscherlein, 1926

Otto Schubert, Hoch die Republik, 1928

See the full “Kinderbuch series” of German, Austrian, and Swiss children’s books
See all children’s books on 50 Watts

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Kling-Klang-Gloria-Vintage-Children-s-Books-from-Austria

Ex Libris Mr. Reaper (11)

Bookplates from the collection of Richard Sica
Leonid Stroganov (Russian, b. 1979)
Max Švabinský (Czech, 1873–1962)
F. S. Coburn (Canadian, 1871–1960)
Vladimir Suchánek (Czech, b. 1933)
Jrisdu (?)
Fritz Gilsi (Swiss, 1878–1961)
Henry Chapsony (?)
Harry Jurgens (Estonian, lives and works in Germany, b. 1949)
See all bookplate posts on 50 Watts (including parts 1 through 10 of this series).
This post first appeared on

By: 50 Watts
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Source: http://50watts.com/Ex-Libris-Mr-Reaper-11