Tag Archives: Retronaut

c. 1510 – 1513: “A cloudburst of material posessions” Leonardo Da Vinci

Cloudburst Da Vinci 1

Bequeathed to Francesco Melzi; from whose heirs purchased by Pompeo Leoni, c.1582-90; Thomas Howard, 2nd Earl of Arundel, by 1630; Probably acquired by Charles II; Royal Collection by 1690
Description:

From the clouds descends a rain of material possessions, which lie about on the earth below. On the clouds, to the left, something that could be a lion advances in profile to the right.

By: Retronaut
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
Source: http://j.mp/Wz6kAv

c. 1900: Book covers

Cover and binding of "Saracinesca" (1894) by Marion F. Crawford. Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of “Saracinesca” (1894) by Marion F. Crawford. Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of "The Day of the Dog" (1904) by George Barr McCutcheon. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of “The Day of the Dog” (1904) by George Barr McCutcheon. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of "The Romance of Zion Chapel" (1898) by Richard Le Gallienne. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of “The Romance of Zion Chapel” (1898) by Richard Le Gallienne. Designed by Will Bradley (1868-1962). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of "A Queen: A Story for Girls" (1870) by Ottilie Wildermuth. Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of “A Queen: A Story for Girls” (1870) by Ottilie Wildermuth. Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of "The Bastille" (1901) by Denis Bingham. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Cover and binding of “The Bastille” (1901) by Denis Bingham. Designed by Margaret Armstrong (1867-1944). Image courtesy University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

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1911: Sitting in the Willamette Meteorite

“The Willamette Meteorite, officially named Willamette, is an iron-nickel meteorite discovered in Oregon. It is the largest meteorite found in North America and the sixth largest in the world. There was no impact crater at the discovery site; researchers believe the meteorite landed in what is now Canada or Montana, and was transported as a glacial erratic to the Willamette Valley during the Missoula Floods at the end of the last Ice Age (~13,000 years ago).

“The Meteorite weighs about 32,000 pounds (15,000 kg) and is over 91% iron and 7.62% nickel, with traces of cobalt and phosphorus.”
Willamette Meteorite 1

By: Retronaut
Via: Feedbin Starred Entries
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1953: “House for the Atomic Age”

“A swimming pool that becomes an automatic decontamination bath during an A-bomb attack is one of the features of a home that Hal B. Hayes, Hollywood contractor, is completing for himself. In the hillside next to the swimming pool he’s building an underground sanctuary that you reach by diving into the pool. His house is designed to “bring the outdoors indoors” for ordinary peaceful living, yet has a structure built to resist great destructive forces. Several of the walls are completely of glass that would be swept away by a powerful shock wave, but could later be replaced. A continuation of his living-room rug is pulled up to shroud the glass wall in that room when a button is pressed.

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1984: Behind the Scenes of Dune

“Dune is a 1984 American science fiction action film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. The plot concerns a young man foretold as the “Kwisatz Haderach” who will lead the native Fremen of the titular desert planet to victory over the malevolent House Harkonnen.

“The film was not well received by critics and performed poorly at the American box office. Upon its release, Lynch distanced himself from the project, stating that pressure from both producers and financiers restrained his artistic control and denied him final cut privilege. In some cuts, Lynch’s name is replaced in the credits with the name Alan Smithee, a pseudonym used by directors who wished not to be associated with a film for which they would normally be credited.”

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