Tagged: Visual News

A Handmade Maze 7 Years in the Making

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Recently on Twitter, a Japanese girl who goes by the username @Kya7y revealed a photo that has excited puzzle fans around the world. It was a picture of a complex maze that her father spent 7 years creating nearly 30 years ago- by hand. The maze is approximately 23 x 33 inches in size and the requests for copies for people eager to try to complete it overwhelmed @Kya7y. There is no word on whether or not she will be making copies available, but she has shared the much-wondered about answer to people’s questions about her father’s occupation- he works in the athletic department at a public university… as a janitor!

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Street Artist Works With Nemesis to Tell His Story

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In Newcastle passersby have grown very familiar to street art by Mobstr, especially his arch-nemesis: the city’s buff man who paints over the graffiti. Rather than getting frustrated, Mobstr has incorporated the buff man into his work to tell a story on Jerome Street. Starting with “Once upon a time…” he told The Story one line at a time as soon as the previous was covered up by the buffer. From message writer to message remover, this paint battle tells a beautiful story.

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Like all of our favorite narratives, this graffiti story finishes with “the end.” and one more buffing job, giving the buff man the last laugh, but that’s just this story and there are many more walls in Newcastle. To some the buffed out graffiti is also a form of art, as you will see the excerpt from The Subconscious Art of Graffiti Removal directed by Matt McCormick at the bottom of the post. Check out more work by Mobstr on his website.

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Punchy, Paper Cut Action Silhouettes

From scenes of western bar brawls to trigger-happy zombie hunters delivering headshots, the silhouette art of David Reeves covers broad-spectrum action scenes. Halifax-based artist / designer / photographer David Reeves re-creates action landscapes borrowed from movies and video games using paper, an x-acto knife, some clever lighting techniques and his trusty Cannon camera. Reeves captures the silhouettes of samurais, Batman, cowboys, aliens and scenes from the stunningly visual video game, Limbo (just to name a few).

His drool-worthy art is definitely worth a peek:

Batman makes an appearance…

How it’s made: silhouette style
Re-creation, some amazing scenes inspired by Limbo
Super hero junkie? The art of Andy Fairhurst profiles kids with super powers

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Tumblr Treasures- Pen & Ink

Whenever I see an interesting tattoo, I love to ask the person to share with me the meaning behind it. In doing this, I’ve heard some truly fascinating stories and some that are more like: “I don’t know, my friend was getting a tattoo so I just picked out something on the wall.” If you have a tattoo with a meaningful story behind it, are thinking about getting one but can’t decide what, or just like hearing about other peoples’ tattoos, then we’ve found the perfect Tumblr for you! Pen & Ink was created by Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton as a place for those with body art to share the stories behind it. It features each person’s name and occupation, a fun sketch of each tattoo diagraming where it is on the body, and, of course, the reasoning for it.

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Whiteboard Drawings Done on a Short Lunch Break

Think you’ve got whiteboard art skills? Just check out these drawings by Gregory Euclide who creates each astounding piece on his short 25 minute lunch break. It’s hard to believe the speed with which he must create each of the detailed pieces, seamlessly working in both realistic architectural elements and abstract linear swooshes. Unlike so many illustrations done with dry erase markers – which only leave crisp well defined lines – his works mix in drips and wet streaks from areas he’s moistened. The results hardly look as if they could be drawn on whiteboard at all.

See Also Black/White: Beautiful Chalkboard Typography

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Traditional Chinese Art Made With a Nail Gun

Taiwanese artist Chen Chun-Hao is bringing a thousand year old art form into the 21st century, using modern tools which would rarely be considered for making art. Using a nail gun and small “mosquito nails” (tiny headless nails), he shoots thousands into canvas covered boards to reproduce the look of traditional Chinese ink landscape paintings. From a distance these mediums smoothly merge together, forming fine lines and delicate shading, but from a closer perspective their sharp metallic nature comes forth.

See Also Chinese Photographs Look Like Traditional Paintings

Many of Chen Chun-Hao’s works are copies of classic Chinese shanshui (mountain/water) paintings, such as the 11th-century Fan Kuan and Guo Xi. While copying has been a long accepted tradition in Chinese art, the new artist must have a deep understanding of the original master while also adding something new. Chen clearly does this and enjoys the contradictions his art entails: using sharp objects and loud machinery to create works intended to be tranquil and meditative, rendering two-dimensional paintings in three-dimensional bas-relief and copying artworks originally intended for the emperor’s court with cheap, mass-produced objects.

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Visual Bits #208> Organized Chaos In Art

The Warped Digital World of Jordan Speer

Welcome to the warped digital world of Jordan Speer. His illustrations create a surreal environment full of robots and strange machinery with a distinctly humanistic twist… mostly, everything from drum sets to rockets and drilling machines come to life and grows gigantic eyes. It’s as if we have traveled to some alternate universe or distant future where technology is alive and aware of its environment.

See Also Bohemian Dreams in Digital Art

Further lending to its unique appearance, Speer’s perfectionistic work is full of burnt orange and blue details which emphasize his unusual use of three-dimensional form. In this sense, the images are almost sculptural in their execution, drawing us in to the unusual juxtapositions and combinations of subject matter, which nonetheless make sense in some dreamlike way. For more of his strange scenes, see Speer’s website BeefStrong.com.

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Santtu’s Painterly 3D Illustrations Go Pop!

I really can’t pull my eyes away from these snappy illustrations by Santtu Mustonen. His highly unique style has a three dimensional, painterly look that is unlike anything I’ve seen. The renderings are as crisp as they are bright, many looking like extruded swirls of multi-colored wet paint. Only adding to the grip this work has on my attention, Santtu has animated a number of his illustrations in GIF form, giving them some of the smoothest and perfectly rendered motion I’ve seen from this sort of thing.

Santtu has been commissioned for plenty of inspiring projects. The illustration above, as well as a number more in this post, are from a series for the 2011 Flow Festival in Helsinki. The steadily rocking boat below is from a Wired Magazine article featuring some of the countries notable outlaw radio stations. His other work has ranged from sharp animations of products going Bang to a painterly fabric printed in his own signature aesthetic.

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Currency Art: Taken From the Pockets of the Military

Sometimes life creates art inspiration in strange ways. For artist Chad Person, the inspiration for his humorously titled series TaxCut came in the form of a failing soldier in his digital photography class. Person relates on his website how, when he found out the soldier would have to repay his $400 course tuition grant to the military for his failure, the artist saw an opportunity to make sure the military couldn’t assign the funds elsewhere, like buying more weapons. How? As Person puts it:

“In a time of war, we all need to make tough choices. I chose that day to change a grade, passing a failed student with an A+ to ensure that his tuition fees – which had fortunately found their way into education via a defense allocation, would remain there. He didn’t deserve to pass based on his performance, but I saw it as a rare opportunity to take a little back from our government’s excessive defense spending, even if it might have been just enough to halt the purchase of one box of ammunition.”

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