Tag Archives: Words and Pictures From Old Books

Panik! Panik!, from Jugend [German art maagazine] (1900), added on 13th April 2013

Panik! Panik!

Everyone in the dance hall runs screaming, fleeing for their lives, when the medusa demon appears!

Note, this was a double-page spread in issue 8 of Jugend Magazine, and the line down the middle is where the pages joined.

(read more…)

(Via Words and Pictures From Old Books)

Jugend Magazine, January 1900, Front Cover, from Jugend [German art maagazine] (1900), added on 12th April 2013

Jugend Magazine, January 1900, Front Cover

The front cover from Jugend Magazine from Issue Two, January 1900. It features a blindfolded woman barefoot, resting one foot on a wheel, holding a cornucopia from which roses are falling. She reaches out and moves the minute hand of a clock forward past XII. There are wings at her hand. The clock-face bears the signs of the zodiac and rays of light shoot out all around, from which we are to understand that the woman represents Time and the passage in January from one year to the next.

(read more…)

(Via Words and Pictures From Old Books)

Interior of the Temple Church., from Old England: A Pictorial Museum (1845), added on 13th Aug 2012

Interior of the Temple Church.

The Temple Church was built by (or for) the Knights Templar in London in the 12th Century. Some time after the Knights Templar were destroyed (in 1307) the temple was given by Edward II to the Knights Hospitaller, who in turn rented it out ot the Inner Temple and Middle Temple, two societies of lawyers, who still hold it today.

(read more…)

(Via Words and Pictures From Old Books)

111.—Norman Keep, Pevensey., from Old England: A Pictorial Museum (1845), added on 9th Aug 2012

111.—Norman Keep, Pevensey.

A ruined castle with broken towers overgrown with ivy looms in the background on a hill or mound; in the foreground people admire the view; to emphasise the pastoral nature of the scene there are also some cows on the right.

(read more…)

(Via Words and Pictures From Old Books)

Robert Fludd – The Mirror of the Whole of Nature and the Image of Art, from Collected Occult Images (1617), added on 8th Aug 2012

Robert Fludd - The Mirror of the Whole of Nature and the Image of Art

This engraving, captioned Integra Natura fpeculum Artisque imago, which is, The whole(ness) of nature reflected in the mirror of art, appeared in Utriusque cosmi maioris scilicet et minoris metaphysica, physica atque technica historia by Robert Fludd in 1617/18. The title of the book is roughly translated as The metaphysical, physical, and technical history of the two worlds, namely the greater and the lesser. The image shows a naked woman crowned with the stars and at her feet the sphere of earth and sea, the elements of earth and water; behind her the heavens with the constallations around them. Under her feet the worls, with a monkey holding a globe, and the various works of man. The animal, vegetable and mineral spheres are clearly visible. At the top, connected by a chain to the woman’s hand, is the hand of God.

(read more…)

(more…)

Poitiers., from Cathedral Cities of France (1907), added on 31st May 2012

Poitiers.

Saint Pierre at Poitiers […] certain characteristics it has which connect it with the Angevin style, but unlike most of the Angevin churches, it has aisles throughout. From the outside the appearance is that of a single mass, long and low, and very wide, for the aisles are nearly as broad as the nave; as at Bourges, there is no central tower at the crossing; but then at Bourges we have a great French church, a mighty mass rising sheer up from the ground, un- broken by any transept; here at Poitiers there are transepts, but the line of their towers comes below the line of the roof, and the effect given is one of length without height. Height is also wanting in the two unfinished and unequal west towers, and the east end literally falls flat, by reason of its bare terminal wall; the apse, to which one grows so accustomed in a French church, is seen only from the interior. It is oblong in plan, showing, as M. VioUet-le-Duc points out, no sign either of choir or sanctuary. The tran- septs are more like side chapels with altars on their eastern walls. There is no sign of northern influ- ence, and the church is in many of its features unique and without imitators. Certain details of construc- tion bring it into line with St. Maurice at Angers; it is an ordinary example of the churches of Poitou, with their three naves of equal height and Byzantine cupolas.

(more…)

The Columbarium., from South by East: Notes of Travel in Southern Europe (1877), added on 29th May 2012

The Columbarium.

It is a funeral procession: the mourners walk in line down the steps and into the columbarium where the ashes of the dead will be placed. The chamber is lit by torches carried by mourners and also by narrow shafts of sunlight from above. In the walls are niches for the ashes. The bereaved kneels ready to receive the ashes; on the righ, two musicians (possibly slaves, since they are barefoot and shirtless) play a dirge on double-stemmed horns.

(read more…)

(Via Words and Pictures From Old Books)